To be vulnerable is to be human.

Grits and Greens, Vol. 3

Grits and Greens, Vol. 3

Today’s Grits & Greens continued its contribution to the intersection of Food, Art and Technology.

Three panelists: a poet, an artist and a technologist introduced new insights and approaches to many disciplines we take for granted. (http://new.livestream.com/accounts/1965149/events/1875257)

Beyond the curated discussion the question was asked– “What makes you vulnerable?”

It’s a leveling subject and speaks to deep-rooted emotions that underpin our lives.  A question that uncovers the “real” truths behind influencers and innovators.

Admitting to being vulnerable penetrates the traditional values of “success” – unwavering confidence, certainty and self belief.  Its the most important (and uncomfortable) emotion for learning, growth and positive change.

For Kimberly Bryant, her “strong, Southern exterior” crumbles when young girls in her program “step up and show confidence”.  Seeing them “grow and blossom”, despite their vulnerabilities, echoes Kimberly’s own pioneering efforts in Silicon Valley.

Mike Duhon shared his fears of not delivering to clients expectations (in his design-build firm).  More importantly his role in cooking/teaching, while living with HIV for the last 30 years, places him in a vulnerable position–especially with institutions who are litigiously driven.

Chinaka Hodge–a thriving poet, artist, writer and filmaker (among many talents) sees her vulnerability linked to the high-visibility of success, and the public’s perceived access to her. “People think they know me”…finding the balance between doing what she loves, and maintaining a sense of privacy she can “own”, is an ongoing battle.

Many hide their vulnerability through outward shows of defiance that take time and patience to overcome.”  James Pickford, FT: Second Chance for Disenfranchised Youth

Grits & Greens continues to instil wisdom beyond our breakfast gathering. As we seek solutions to social problems (on both sides of the Atlantic), perhaps viewing vulnerability as a strength–rather than a weakness is a good place to start.

Panelists:

Ashara Ekundayo, Curator/Moderator – http://flavors.me/asharaekundayo

Chinaka Hodge – Poet/Playwright/Filmmaker – http://www.ChinakaHodge.com and http://www.TheGetback.com

Kimberly Bryant, Founder – http://www.BlackGirlsCode.org

Mike Duhon – Chef/Educator – http://www.artistryinforms.com

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